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 Post subject: SLO Design Questions
PostPosted: Nov 21st, '20, 07:49 
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Here and elsewhere, I have seen people use a T at the top of an SLO. I have used this myself, and am happy with how it works. My understanding is that it prevents a siphon from forming and emptying the tank, and serves as an overflow if the Upright SLO pipe clogs.

I was wondering if this would work? Or, if anyone has used anything like this successfully.

What if a 90 degree elbow had a hole drilled or cut into the top? It would still let the plumbing breathe, and could take some water in the event of an overflow.

Attachment:
slo top fitting.jpg
slo top fitting.jpg [ 69.9 KiB | Viewed 484 times ]


I picked up a grab bag of 3 and 4 inch fittings, that was contractor excess, but it is one T short for what I was thinking of doing. So if this would work, it would give me enough T's.

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 Post subject: Re: SLO Design Questions
PostPosted: Nov 22nd, '20, 03:03 
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114 views and no replies? Cmon folk get involved!
Yes Will it would work, as you correctly said break siphon and overflow but also fish escape. ;) Remember the SLO needs a higher outside water level to create good suction at the bottom to remove the solids. What design are you using at the base of the SLO?
The top hole/s can go anywhere on the top horizontal pipe and there’s no need to glue the pipe work within the pipe so it can be changed out if you choose.

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 Post subject: Re: SLO Design Questions
PostPosted: Nov 22nd, '20, 07:07 
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Hey Skeg,
I was thinking of going with a 4-3 in reducer, the grab bag of fittings I got, literally a big trash bag, came with quite a few of them. I would notch out about 1/2 inch cuts, or maybe a little more at the bottom for inflow.
Attachment:
SLO base .jpg
SLO base .jpg [ 63.46 KiB | Viewed 346 times ]


I didn't think about the hole at the T , or elbow, being a possible fish escape route. Fortunately the fish that will be moving in are bigger than that, but I could do it temporarily, and change it out at a later point.

I have used a length of notched pipe to the SLO upright in the IBC system, and it works pretty well, but solids do accumulate every once in a while. I have been trying a different, slightly less protein content feed, and the fish produce a different type of solid, that is finer and that floats less. It seems to clog less.

Being that these are round tanks, an exit at the center seems more appropriate.

Any thoughts about how to transition from the SLO's to the rff?

Attachment:
SLO OUTFLOW .jpg
SLO OUTFLOW .jpg [ 57.26 KiB | Viewed 346 times ]


Can I have the two tanks go to the one RFS/RFF?

1. This is a big one, since I would have to drain the tanks to move them if this doesn't work out. I would think it should or could work....If the plumbing is joined. I was thinking of trying the over top entry, with a baffle to slow the flow. (I picked this up from Web 4 Deb's video.) BUT, and it's a big one, I don't know if I have enough height to pull off a top entry, so I might have to figure something else out.

I only have two 3-inch uniseals, which would be going on the fish tanks. Maybe the RFF tank could be notched so the pipes wouldn't need to set directly on top.

2.Can my plumbing be 2 inches from this point on?
According to a chart that I saw floating around the web, 2 inch should be able to handle the flow.

So it would be something like 3 inch SLO to RFF to 2 inch RFF exit, to MBBR, to 2 inch exit, to 2 inch plumbing to grow beds...

I have quite a few 2 inch uniseals and bulkheads to use.

Any input or ideas are welcome.

Thanks for the cheer leading Skeg! Lets bring the forum back!!! :)

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 Post subject: Re: SLO Design Questions
PostPosted: Nov 22nd, '20, 07:54 
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Yep, all looks ok to me, as long as you can regulate the inflow to the ft’s joining as per dwg should be fine but may be noisy as it makes and breaks siphon.
On my round tanks I have dished the ground before seating the tank. One I had to make heightened to tie it in so I used a circle of bricks the same diameter as the base, just loose, and filled it with dirt, well clay here actually, and had a fall to the centre of the circle prob about 1” in your antiquated measurement right where the slo sits. I never have solids build up in any of these tanks, I do however occasionally need to increase the velocity in the slo to remove solids in the upright. I also had to cut 2 uprights as I forgot to add this extra 1” doh.
I hope this answers your questions and I’m sure others would like to chip in with suggestions.... hint hint.
:P

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 Post subject: Re: SLO Design Questions
PostPosted: Nov 22nd, '20, 08:33 
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Haha! I will try to be more with the times on my measurements, but it's hard to teach an old brain new tricks...Ok, I am feeling closer to a resolution....Thanks! I raised the tanks 2 inches higher than the grade to create a little more drop....There I go again, d'ohhh. 50 mm higher...

I used something that ha my wife questioning my sanity......but I think it will be fine.

I used 50 mm rigid blue board insulation. I had a lot of it....my thoughts were that the even pressure from the weight of the water would keep it uniform... without squishing it.....
It seems to be much more susceptible to focused pressure in one spot.

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 Post subject: Re: SLO Design Questions
PostPosted: Nov 23rd, '20, 02:23 
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A couple of thoughts for you. The reason for the Tee fitting is to adjust the water level above the drain opening for the SLO. Which is needed for adequate flow rate. More flow means better vacuuming effect. You see I and probably most others didn't think about flow dynamics and gravity pressure and put the sump at the same elevation as the main tank. For slow systems thats fine and if your system is flowing slow enough then that 90 with a whole big enough to break the vacuume then it will work. How ever, when water is flowing into the hole you aren't vacuuming the bottom. Slower flow rates mean weaker vacuuming effect so bottom of tank won't be spotless and heavy particulate will be harder to remove.

With a flood and drain style system won't really see your tank level fluctuate that drastically because it has time equilize. But if you put a bypass in for a return sprayer to help aerate your tank you will see a flow rate increase and the main tank level rise. In the summer i like all the aeration i can get and it can raise my water level 4 or 5 inches. Remember when water is flowing into the top opening then it is no longer a slow.

So anything can work with caveats and with in reason. I say go for it if it fits the bill. but there is always catch 22 you didn't see till a year down the road or 3 months in and you notice a strange problem.

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 Post subject: Re: SLO Design Questions
PostPosted: Nov 23rd, '20, 05:26 
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Thanks RC!
That is an interesting bit about the T allowing the water to rise, ultimately creating more suction.
I hadn't realized or thought about that part functioning that way.

How's your system going RC? Updates? Pics?

I think I am just going to go with the T. I picked up two garbage bags full of fittings, but had only gone through the 3" bag. I went through the 4" bag today, and found a 3 inch T! Score!

I'm still wondering about the flow affecting everything.

I looked at my pump specs again, and it should be pumping a little over 1000 gph (3880 LPH) at my head height, but a lot of people say they get higher flow rates than advertised with these pumps.

My plan is to split the line to both tanks, which should essentially give me 500 gph (1890 LPH) to each tank.

Each tank is over 400 gallons. One around 400 (1500 L) , and the other around 475 (1800 L).

Before I drill the holes.......Do I really need to go up to 3 inch (76 MM) at that flow rate, or would I be able to get away with 2 in (50 MM)?

Also, I'm worrying that the retention time might not be long enough for solids to settle well in my standard blue Drum RFF.

Also, I don't want it to overflow.

It probably only holds around 40-45 GAL (150-170 L) of water because I fashioned a cone into it.

From here, I was hoping to drop to 2 in (50 MM) between filters, and to the beds, just for practical matters. (I already have a lot of what I need.

Or, should I have an overflow on the fish tanks, going back to the sump to lower the flow through the RFF?
Maybe I could do a sieve before the sump to catch any solids that make their way through.

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 Post subject: Re: SLO Design Questions
PostPosted: Nov 30th, '20, 05:39 
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This might help - has a description of how I setup my SLO intake and a picture of Tori's which is basically setup like mine. The larger area of the net pot helps keep the intake from getting blocked. My tank is round and the intake is a single pipe going to the bottom at the center of the tank.

http://www.backyardaquaponics.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=18&t=21202&hilit=SLO+net&start=60

Photos are on the page it's linked to and my description is on the preceding page.


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