All times are UTC + 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sep 10th, '16, 03:52 
Offline

Joined: Sep 10th, '16, 03:41
Posts: 2
Gender: Male
Are you human?: yes
Location: Wisconsin
First post, first question...

I had a very successful season with tomatoes and some warm peppers, but any of my super hot pepper plants (Ghost and hotter) didn't grow much at all. I think my pH was too high throughout the season, but I don't know what fish can handle having a pH lower than 5.5 all the time to give my super hot plants a boost. Any suggestions for lowering pH in one section of an AQ system, but not others, or is there something else I'm doing wrong?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
    Advertisement
 
PostPosted: Sep 10th, '16, 15:05 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Aug 26th, '10, 07:17
Posts: 8589
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Oregon, USA
Welcome to the forum :wave:

Can't help you much with the really hot peppers (I have grown some serranos, jalapenos and habaneros and am currently growing some Peruvian Lemon Drop peppers) but I know we've had quite a few people here in the past grow them - http://www.backyardaquaponics.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=45&t=20546

Haven't heard from DecalsbyJT for awhile but he had a really great looking chocolate habanero growing. CoachChris bottles his own hot sauce and I know there are others here who've grown them or tried to. With a bit of luck someone will chime in.

I think the water temp was too low early on and the peppers stalled out and never really kicked in because of this. Some of the milder peppers don't seem as sensitive to this. Try setting up a wicking bed. These warm faster in the spring and hold their heat better than a standard AP grow bed so your peppers should do better.

Cheers


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sep 10th, '16, 16:11 
Offline
A posting God
A posting God
User avatar

Joined: Sep 29th, '14, 13:15
Posts: 2081
Location: Australia
Gender: Male
Are you human?: mostly
Location: Perth, West Aust
can't comment on specific species of USA 'hot peppers' you are specifically referring to. But my experience with Chilli's and Jalapeno here in Aust is that they grow much better in wicking beds than the AP. I get much better yields. They also like being a bit drier and long periods of warm-hot sun.

_________________
.
Darren ( dlf_perth )

May the fish sh*t and the plants grow.....


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sep 13th, '16, 07:37 
Offline
A posting God
A posting God
User avatar

Joined: Dec 12th, '13, 18:34
Posts: 3846
Gender: Male
Are you human?: Yes
Location: Adelaide
If you wanted to lower pH just around plant roots, you could put something like coffee grounds around the roots of the pepper plants. I've never tried it, but heard it works.

_________________
My System

My Aquaponic Youtube Channel

The Black-Byron Ice Creamery Youtube Channel


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sep 13th, '16, 08:11 
Offline
Bordering on Legend
Bordering on Legend

Joined: Dec 15th, '14, 11:18
Posts: 289
Gender: Male
Are you human?: YES
Location: Aldie, VA USA
What was your pH at? Peppers are usually more susceptible to temp of water more than anything else. CoachChris grows a ton of super hot peppers and he has had trouble getting pH down but hasn't heavily affected his production.

_________________
Eddie


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Portal by phpBB3 Portal © phpBB Türkiye
[ Time : 0.076s | 18 Queries | GZIP : Off ]