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 Post subject: Re: What is a SLO?
PostPosted: Apr 20th, '17, 22:37 
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Water coming in to the tank raising the water height above the SLO outlet causes a pressure difference forcing water through your SLO inlet and out the overflow outlet. This is similar to the air powered canisters you see at bank drive thru's for sending checks and paperwork to/from the teller.

You can increase/decrease the overall effect by speeding up or slowing down your water flow coming in to the thank. The other factor would be using larger or smaller holes in the pick up pipe to effect it in a more localized basis; I would advise against using smaller holes since they could clog and cause your system to overflow.

Yes you could come up from the bottom of the tank directly to the upflow in your RFF. I've kind of thought of that before it just depends on if you want the SLO to set your tank water level or the RFF to; either way works though.

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 Post subject: Re: What is a SLO?
PostPosted: Apr 21st, '17, 05:11 
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LowCarbTNPer

Thanks for the info


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 Post subject: Re: What is a SLO?
PostPosted: Apr 21st, '17, 08:58 
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The other main benefit of an SLO coming up and exiting at the top of the tank is that it maintains the water height in your fish tank no matter what - if you come out of the bottom of the tank, a leak or pipe break elsewhere in the system can drain your tank and kill your fish. With a proper SLO the only thing that can drain your tank is a leak in the tank itself.

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 Post subject: Re: What is a SLO?
PostPosted: Apr 21st, '17, 09:18 
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Mel Redcap wrote:
The other main benefit of an SLO coming up and exiting at the top of the tank is that it maintains the water height in your fish tank no matter what - if you come out of the bottom of the tank, a leak or pipe break elsewhere in the system can drain your tank and kill your fish. With a proper SLO the only thing that can drain your tank is a leak in the tank itself.


Definitely a major benefit and why I never used anything but a top exit SLO either.

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 Post subject: Re: What is a SLO?
PostPosted: Jun 9th, '17, 00:29 
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What factors determine the suction from a SLO

I'm getting great flow through rates using 2" piping

But the solids do not appear to be pulled/sucked/vacuumed into the SLO
There is only a 4" circle that appears clean on a 3" foot ?

So what determines the suction

Thanks in advance


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 Post subject: Re: What is a SLO?
PostPosted: Jun 9th, '17, 06:00 
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LowCarbTNPer wrote:
Water coming in to the tank raising the water height above the SLO outlet causes a pressure difference forcing water through your SLO inlet and out the overflow outlet. This is similar to the air powered canisters you see at bank drive thru's for sending checks and paperwork to/from the teller.


Yeegods and little fishes are those things still around? I remember them as a kid and thought they would be great to clean up my room.

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 Post subject: Re: What is a SLO?
PostPosted: Jun 9th, '17, 07:37 
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TheBearF8 wrote:
What factors determine the suction from a SLO

I'm getting great flow through rates using 2" piping

But the solids do not appear to be pulled/sucked/vacuumed into the SLO
There is only a 4" circle that appears clean on a 3" foot ?

So what determines the suction

Thanks in advance


An SLO isn't going to pull in solids from much further away than that - anything that was sucking water hard enough to draw in solids from all over your tank bottom would drain the tank pretty darn fast! Generally solids removal depends on other factors bringing the solids close enough to the SLO inlet/s to be drawn in. Some people have tanks with sloped bottoms, some set up the water inflow to 'swirl' the tank water around, some depend on the fish to stir things up on the bottom.

I angled my inflow pipe to cause as much of a circular current as I could, but since I have a long narrow tank I knew that wasn't going to be enough. I built my SLO with a long pipe along the centre of the tank bottom with slots cut in the bottom of it, so it wasn't picking up from only one spot, and I attached air stones to the top of it to cause an upward current there and water movement towards it along the bottom. I also have an air stone on a long piece of tubing that I used to drop to the bottom of the tank anywhere I saw solids accumulating; the bubbles would make a nice little localised upcurrent that picked stuff up and put it back into circulation, which gave it another chance to go past the SLO and get sucked up, but now that my fish are bigger they're keeping the bottom nice and clean.

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 Post subject: Re: What is a SLO?
PostPosted: Jun 9th, '17, 10:28 
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Also if you check my thread I built my SLO in the shape of a + sign and it worked really well.

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 Post subject: Re: What is a SLO?
PostPosted: Jun 9th, '17, 11:49 
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>> So what determines the suction

The current drawn into the pipe must be sufficient to mobilise the solids.
Buoyant solids will simply follow the water, but heavier bottom solids require a bit of current energy to tumble.

As you get away from the SLO intake the current energy diminishes quite rapidly.


>> Also if you check my thread I built my SLO in the shape of a + sign and it worked really well.

+1 - that is one option. You can also make a T at the SLO base (for an IBC) and have two parallel intake pipes.
Others have used 2 SLOS (usually to improve outflow without going to larger pipe diameters)

The trick is to balance your intakes with the flow and make it easy for debris to get into the pipe.
Too many intakes would lower the current/suction effect.

As Mel notes - you can use circular currents (circulation) and sloping bottoms help cause the solids to move to one area of the tank (as done in commercial aquaculture). And people around forum have tried to enhance the SLO effect by adding air above the SLO. The upwards flow of bubbles causes a dragging in of water (ie. additional current).

As an addition - in cases people have also added intakes higher up the SLO to better access the water column to deal with suspended solids. Some people have this as an option and just cap it off when not in use.

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