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PostPosted: Jul 26th, '15, 11:46 
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Hi all

Iread that we can deposition calcium carbonate by adding calcium hydroxide

so can we use this way in separate barrel to remove calcium carbonate

BR


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PostPosted: Aug 1st, '15, 23:39 
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Hi BR, I'm not a Chemist but it's probably based on something like this - http://www.gewater.com/handbook/ext_treatment/ch_7_precipitation.jsp


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PostPosted: Aug 2nd, '15, 06:04 
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thank you scotty .

the problem in our wether here in jordan that i lose every day 20litres from200litres in my NFT so no way to bring the PH down with that calcium carobonae.

thank you again for your reply

best regards


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PostPosted: Aug 2nd, '15, 06:54 
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Here's a better one - http://water.me.vccs.edu/concepts/softeninglime.html

and another one

http://water.me.vccs.edu/exam_prep/limesodaash.htm

Obviously this isn't something you'd do in the system, it would have to be done ahead of use. Reverse Osmosis might be an option but might make it impractical for other reasons.


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PostPosted: Aug 2nd, '15, 07:41 
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Hi.. has anyone found a likely reaction line for Calcium Chloride... under AP conditions
Being another compound recommended for helping fish with Nitrites.. it will make calcium available to plants and I imagine a likely result being NaCl. Ie. Common salt .. (though I can only guess where the Sodium will come from..)
..
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PostPosted: Aug 2nd, '15, 09:36 
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Take what I'm about to say with a huge grain of salt BuiDoi.

I believe these are all ion charged based reactions. Assuming Calcium Chloride goes into solution then the calcium should be available without any additional reaction (unless it precipitates out with something else), just as the chloride ion is available to compete with nitrite for uptake. This little video might help explain the uptake mechanism - http://highered.mheducation.com/sites/9834092339/student_view0/chapter38/animation_-_mineral_uptake.html

It's different for negatively and positively charged ions.


Ca +2
Cl -1
Na +1
NO2 -1

Here's some additional listings of ion charges
http://www.sciencegeek.net/Chemistry/chempdfs/CommonIons.pdf


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PostPosted: Aug 2nd, '15, 23:00 
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I did some more looking around BuiDoi. There is an example of someone dissolving Calcium chloride in distilled water on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYy9B6vnCtI. Apparently it's a very strongly exothermic reaction (it gives off heat). Once the Calcium chloride is dissolved in water you should be able to add it to your AP system and get the benefits of both the calcium and chloride ions (undissolved portions should not be used). The ions associate with the water molecules and are no longer coupled to each other so they move freely in solution. I suppose it's possible that they will precipitate back out when added to the system, I don't know, it's been a very very long time since chemistry classes for me :dontknow:

I wouldn't try to dissolve too much at once because of the exothermic reaction and of course follow all precautions and use at your own risk since I'm not real up on this stuff anymore.


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PostPosted: Aug 3rd, '15, 04:22 
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The warnings are interesting, but I respectfully wonder..

I can buy large bottles of the stuff in our local hardware stores, for use as a closet desiccant, and there see no warnings about dangers. :-).

I refer back to Koi practice of using the stuff to mittigate the effect of nitrates for fish.. a substitute. for safe. NaCl., I assume, as they talk about the chloride. Ion providing the protection..

My simplistic thinking... if you want chloride, and sodium is not useful, then calcium certainly is, both for the plants and as a buffer with pH.

So adding it to a sump or similar associated. AP component, should be pretty safe.. :-)
..
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PostPosted: Aug 3rd, '15, 06:33 
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I think the warning is just about the exothermic reaction and obviously you wouldn't want your kid swallowing this. I think putting it into solution before adding is a good idea though.

Since you have twice the number of chloride ions you'd have to adjust for this in figuring how much was needed to compete with nitrite.

BuiDoi wrote:
I refer back to Koi practice of using the stuff to mittigate the effect of nitrates fish


You mean nitrites, right?

Some toxicity information down in the tables here - http://www.inchem.org/documents/sids/sids/10043524.pdf. You'll find the genus and species names used.

Pimephales promelas = fathead minnow
Lapomis macrochirus = Bluegill
Gambusia affinis = mosquito fish

There's information on both Sodium Chloride and Calcium Chloride toxicity here - http://water.epa.gov/scitech/swguidance/standards/criteria/upload/chloride1988.pdf

From the looks of things you should be able to use it. I'm not sure what affect adding it will have on plant nutrient uptake compared with adding Na+. It may lock out phosphorus by forming precipitates which would be bad since this is needed for energy production by the plants. It can form precipitates with other elements as well. Anyway, there are some unknowns here so you may want to figure this out on a small scale at first but I'm pretty certain you can do it.

Some additional information that might be useful (it's for soil though, not AP)

http://www.spectrumanalytic.com/support/library/ff/Ca_Basics.htm


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PostPosted: Aug 3rd, '15, 07:01 
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You mean nitrites, right?


Indeed... I have done that a few times now.. one should avoid such discussions when half asleep ..

Thanks for the references .. :-)
..
.peter


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PostPosted: Aug 3rd, '15, 21:13 
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Dears

i am trying to translate all the written by you .

but i have some experince with hydrocloric acid that i was put it in separate water to fix the PH in tap water but my mistake was that i added natrual salt to my nft 200 gram to 200 liters of water ,so i destroid all the palnts in the tubes.i read some where that we must not to add that acid when we use salt .

thank you


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PostPosted: Aug 4th, '15, 01:19 
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Interesting bakir73, probably has something to do with chloride being in both but there could be other reasons.


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