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 Post subject: Re: Member skills
PostPosted: Apr 13th, '17, 02:01 
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I've a Diploma in Horticulture , and a trade certificate in Greenkeeping .

Mostly nursery work , landsape construction and grounds maintenance , golf course and playing fields .

I operate heavy vehicles now , and grow hydroponic home vegetables .

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Also I like dogs , and motorcycles .


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 Post subject: Re: Member skills
PostPosted: Aug 16th, '17, 21:53 
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Seriously, this cant be healthy.
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
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Brianrwa wrote:
I've a Diploma in Horticulture , and a trade certificate in Greenkeeping .

Mostly nursery work , landsape construction and grounds maintenance , golf course and playing fields .

I operate heavy vehicles now , and grow hydroponic home vegetables .

Image

Image

Image

Also I like dogs , and motorcycles .



There's a grass that grows almost totally flat that I think golf courses use for their greens. It looks the same. We went to a commercial campground last year and a few months later found some growing on our back lawn. (we dump grey water from our washing machine on our back lawn (lawn is a generous term... cut weed bed might be better) so probably picked up some seeds) My questions is, why dont we plant theses grasses as laws because they dont ever seem to need mowing. The highest I've ever seen it grow is an inch or so.

If it's because they need too much water or something, is there a mix of golf green, and something else that I can grow that means I dont need to care for it? Perhaps two different varieties that grow in summer and winter that will both grow flat.

?

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 Post subject: Re: Member skills
PostPosted: Aug 17th, '17, 07:02 
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Joined: Jul 20th, '17, 16:19
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I'm no expert in plants but I do study nature. As one inventor said " comprehend and copy nature". I dont know about your grass there but here in the Philippines. flat short grass when planted on places with some shade will grow taller. Also it becomes susceptible to colonizing by taller grass and herbs. From my observation here is how forest are made from barren land.

Any barren land will first be colonize by grass. Then grass will be host to herbs eventually overpowering them. them comes the bush small tress and big tress each smaller plant being host to the bigger one. If I had a patch of land (we are living in an apartment) and I want to plant something I will go by that order without clearing the land of weeds or herbs. Plants any kind needs a host while still small then eventually getting through to the host to receive the full sun when stronger and capable. If you plant them close enouhg to cover the host the host will eventually die and become a compost. This is also going to save putting all those sun barriers and weeding. and watering (barren land dries quickly). Just imagining haven't done it yet but that's how nature do it. with a little help from man I cant see why it cant be done. :wave:

For the skill.

I use to be a professional handyman before the accident. When I am able to work again I will be a gardener. I used to work on merchant ships. will verse with pumps and fluid handling. ICE. refrigeration. Can construct house from foundation to roof and anything in between.


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 Post subject: Re: Member skills
PostPosted: Aug 17th, '17, 16:08 
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Joined: Jul 20th, '17, 16:19
Posts: 145
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Location: philippines
I'm no expert in plants but I do study nature. As one inventor said " comprehend and copy nature". I dont know about your grass there but here in the Philippines. flat short grass when planted on places with some shade will grow taller. Also it becomes susceptible to colonizing by taller grass and herbs. From my observation here is how forest are made from barren land.

Any barren land will first be colonize by grass. Then grass will be host to herbs eventually overpowering them. them comes the bush small tress and big tress each smaller plant being host to the bigger one. If I had a patch of land (we are living in an apartment) and I want to plant something I will go by that order without clearing the land of weeds or herbs. Plants any kind needs a host while still small then eventually getting through to the host to receive the full sun when stronger and capable. If you plant them close enouhg to cover the host the host will eventually die and become a compost. This is also going to save putting all those sun barriers and weeding. and watering (barren land dries quickly). Just imagining haven't done it yet but that's how nature do it. with a little help from man I cant see why it cant be done. :wave:

For the skill.

I use to be a professional handyman before the accident. When I am able to work again I will be a gardener. I used to work on merchant ships. some knowledge on pumps and fluid handling. ICE. refrigeration. Can construct house from foundation to roof and anything in between.


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 Post subject: Re: Member skills
PostPosted: Aug 12th, '18, 04:51 
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Seriously, this cant be healthy.
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
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Joined: Mar 26th, '10, 20:46
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Location: South Australia
I have an anti-berka vrs bikini thing in my facebook world that I'd like to reply to in latin for my own absurd reasons.

That last line is probably worth reading again just for it's unlikeliness.

So I need someone who can translate Latin in a more conversational way than google translate can manage, and who also has an excellent understanding of logical fallacies.

Not an unreasonable demand of BYAP users from where I sit :)

Just to be clear, my political position is unknown even to me, but my frontal cortex is freaking out about the logical fallacy.

I love this place <pulsing heart emoticon>

So...

Is there anyone out there who speaks Latin as their native language, and can name logical fallacies well enough to pass for someone who knows what they are talking about?

What topic bump?*


This is a reasonable request that is pertinent to international aquaponics relations :whistle:



*I do actually need help :)

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My skills include being able to move slowly forward in time, and if I really concentrate, I can sometimes tell what I'm thinking.


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 Post subject: Re: Member skills
PostPosted: Aug 12th, '18, 16:12 
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faaarrrk your a strange man BullwinkleII but I do enjoy reading whatever it is your talking about. :laughing3: :wave1:

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 Post subject: Re: Member skills
PostPosted: Aug 12th, '18, 17:44 
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Obviously John Cleese (not sure how long he has been a member) :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIAdHEwiAy8


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 Post subject: Re: Member skills
PostPosted: Aug 15th, '18, 21:54 
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Oh my... this was a fun read... I especially enjoyed the knife/axe/chainsaw shaving...

BullwinkleII wrote:
Stuart Chignell wrote:
BullwinkleII wrote:
I'm running out of demo arm hair and, as you might imagine, also running out of feigned interest from Mrs Bullwinkle.


:D :laughing3: My wife will think that funny.

Now you need to do it with an axe. The sharpening bit is easier the shaving bit not so much.



In a recent chainsaw shaving incident, an almost hairless man was found bleeding and frowning in front of his computer.


Ronmaggi wrote:
Once you start dressing your chainsaw in flannels, it is a slippery slope from there.



I got a good laugh about it that probably made my co-workers wonder what I was doing.

I do have a chainsaw shaving incident in my past though... luckily it's just a couple of little scars on my thumb to remind me of the experience... my first job that I was officially on payroll was at Tractor Supply Company which is a small farm / hardware store with a big chain of stores here in the states. I started there when I was 16 and the first couple of days I got to assemble wheelbarrows, and the manager told me she was worried because the last person she had assemble wheelbarrows when they were new quit on her pretty quickly. A couple weeks later when the store was running inventory I was told someone had made a mess in the bathroom so I went in to find someone had pooped in the urinal and wiped poop all over the walls that I got to clean up after (who does that to begin with?) so I went in the back room and mixed several chemicals together to use for scrubbing the wall... after the bathroom was clean I got called in to the office because apparently someone complained about the chemical smell that was so strong they thought they would pass out... well the restroom was clean what are you complaining about? Had to open the doors and install huge industrial fans to air the store out... so I had a short stint as an experimental chemist.

After that I moved in to a draftsman position, then mechanical engineering position and finally sales engineering position designing / selling fire truck cabs and chassis... the sales engineering position brought me in to more computer programming requirements too.

I'm also a jack of all trades, but I am a master at a few... I'm a master CAD designer (self proclaimed)... I'm a master scuba diver (certified by NAUI) and working on becoming a NAUI scuba instructor. I've built my share of things and think I need to follow in Bullwinkle's footsteps and start a page to document everything I've done and all of the skills that I've learned.

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My greenhouse / aquaponics adventure
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 Post subject: Re: Member skills
PostPosted: Aug 15th, '18, 23:06 
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Seriously, this cant be healthy.
Seriously, this cant be healthy.
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Joined: Mar 26th, '10, 20:46
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Location: South Australia
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Location: South Australia
I love the diversity of things done over the span of people's lives.
Ask any old person (not anyold person, but any "old" person), and you will freak out about how many things they have done. Work, volunteering, war, whatever.

A boyfriend of my mum's was a wheat farmer, and found himself with a few zillion tons of wheat that had begun to sprout just before harvest while still on the plant because of some rain at the wrong time (or something), so rather than going bankrupt, he bought a few thousand day old chickens and became a chicken farmer.

Not to knock chicken farming, but personally I would have made better use of malted grain, but that's just me :drunken:

The same boyfriend also found that a meteor had dropped onto his paddock one night, and did something I didnt realise farmers of old did. They just dug a hole next to an offending large rock in their paddock, then tunneled under the rock until it fell into the hole, then buried it.

Done.

He's no longer with us, but somewhere out there is a meteor big enough that it couldn't be shifted, and now lies buried under some wheat in South Australia. It's probably worth more than the farm.

It turns out its difficult to remember exactly where your meteor is when your farm is half the size of Texas :) (I did spend quite a bit of time in discussion trying to narrow it down)

So...

To make this post slightly on topic, Mrs Bullwinkle and I are now full time web designers having reinvented ourselves from being full time potters because it seemed like an hilarious opposite end of the spectrum to mess about with (and there were some health issues that made sitting like a puddle in a heated office chair more appealing than actually making stuff) (and in hindsight more appealing than it actually is)

Who would have thought you could make a living from adjusting the arrangement of electrons. Clay seems reasonable, but electrons??? :dontknow: It's been a two years now, but I guess it will take some getting used to.

So if anyone (within reason) wants some free help (within reason) with wordpress stuff, sing out (did I mention "within reason? :) )

Also I think we just started a fishing tackle import/retail business, but I'm not sure yet.

My life is stranger than it seems at first glance.

And I might be distributing, renting or otherwise having something to do with importing and selling or renting a cool new electric ride-on device for commuting/fun sometime in the near future as it seems I'm an amature marketing consultant for such things due to (utterly irrelevant) being friends with a guy from China I met online who is looking for a distributor. I met him because I sent him a few English corrections for his website years ago when I was looking at his solar panels.

Now I'm friends with his seven year old daughter and send her care packages of Australian honey because the honey in China isn't always honey.

Life is like a box of chocolates.

You get fat, and have to worry about getting diabetes, but other than that, it's delicious.



Busy.



I need to create a pension fund to support me for the rest of my life within the next 10 years because I have nothing left after being way too sick for way too long.

But luckily I live in Australia, so everything will be fine no matter what :)

Thanks Australia. :wave:

And I'll work 'till I'm dead anyway, even if it kills me.

:cheers:

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120 THINGS IN 20 YEARS - My blog about my learning adventure

My skills include being able to move slowly forward in time, and if I really concentrate, I can sometimes tell what I'm thinking.


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 Post subject: Re: Member skills
PostPosted: Aug 16th, '18, 18:10 
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Location: Charlotte, MI, USA
Chicken farming...
Pig farming...
Fish farming...
Vegetable farming...


Hah, I started to talk about chainsaw shaving then didn't even post the details of that incident... it was when I was working at Tractor Supply there was an old timer who came in and wanted to buy a new chainsaw, but he didn't like that the chain saws we had in stock only had 16 inch bars on them, he needed a man's saw that had a 20 inch bar on it. So I told him the saw would support a 20 inch bar and we have 20 inch bars in stock. So he decided to buy it, but then complained that he had to assemble it and asked if we would assemble it... at that point in my life I had never assembled a chainsaw bar but I said OK how hard could it be I'll assemble it to make a sale. So I walked the chainsaw and bar to the backroom and grabbed the tools needed to remove the existing bar. Then I went to open the new bar and it is in one of those thermoformed plastic packets that the outer edges are melted to seal together... so I cut down several inches of the package then tried pulling the bar (with chain on it) out of the package and it was pretty resistant but with a little willpower I made it come out, but on the way out it snagged my thumb and started gushing blood. So being as resourceful as I am, even at 16 years old I walked over to the receiving counter and found a roll of clear packing tape and taped my hand up to try and control the bleeding while the old timer is watching all of this happen (looking back I probably shouldn't have allowed him to come to the backroom while I assembled his chainsaw), I finished assembling his saw and sent him on his way then I walked into the office to go clean up my hand and properly bandage it. By this point the blood had made its way out of the clear packing tape and was running down to my elbow, so when I walked in the office and my manager saw me covered in blood she jumped up and immediately insisted that I go to the hospital... but I assured her it wasn't as bad as it looked just it had been a few minutes so the blood had accumulated... so I washed it up and put a bandaide on it and was good to go.... but I did end up with 3 scars on my thumb from it. No stitches... I've never had stitches... since this experience I've discovered that super glue works fantastic for closing up wounds.
Attachment:
thumb.PNG
thumb.PNG [ 453.97 KiB | Viewed 403 times ]


I guess this means I'll never be a hand model... unless it's hand modeling for anti-scar cream maybe...

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My greenhouse / aquaponics adventure
My DIY PVC Hoop House


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